You are here: Home » Blog » Archives for Jilbert’s Bits of Bytes

Jilbert’s Bits of Bytes

I’m a big fan of Photoshop Styles.  I love to create them, use them, and try to convince everyone I know that they’re one of the best Photoshop tools there is!  Today I will show you how you can get some extra mileage out of any Styles you already own, and how to look at Styles in a different way, when you consider future purchases.

Up front, I acknowledge that Styles can be scary.  Often times, a Style will have many design options used in its creation, and each option can have multiple components.  But today, we’re not going to talk about “scary.” We’re going to talk about “easy,” and how to make Styles work for you in a way you may not have thought of before.

For the purposes of this tutorial, I am using Photoshop CS6.  However, this tip should work in all versions of Photoshop.  I also checked this tip in Photoshop Elements (PSE) 9, 11, and 12, and the option is available; so my assumption is that it will work in other versions of PSE also.

Pictured below is one of the line art graphics from Hidden in my Book, a collaboration between Dani (The Urban Fairy) and Jill (Jilbert’s Bits of Bytes). (I totally LOVE this!)

sd_stretch-stash-1

There are multiple ways to use this, or any, line art graphic: leave it as it is, clip a paper to it, colorize it, use blending modes to achieve different results, you name it.

Since this line art graphic was included in a kit, it would certainly make sense to use kit papers as you work with it, so that everything coordinates perfectly.  But let’s say you have a style that you particularly like and want to use because of its pattern. Let’s also say that Style has a bevel on it, and that bevel just doesn’t work with the type of page you are creating. Let’s fix that!

Here is the same line art graphic with a Stratified Rock Style (Set 1) applied to it.  The Bevel of the Style doesn’t look good with this piece of line art, but I really love the color variation and think it goes great with the style and colors of Hidden in my Book.

sd_stretch-stash-2

The color variation you see is the “Pattern” of the Style itself.  And that is what I want to use. Not the Bevel – just the Pattern.

Here are the main options of the Stratified Style:  Bevel & Emboss; Inner Shadow; Pattern Overlay.

Untitled-3

Inside each option, there are additional design choices made, to create this particular style; but that is not important for us to know today.  We just know we don’t want the line art to have a bevel to it, so let’s turn it off.   To do that, click on the Eyeball icon next to Bevel & Emboss.

sd_stretch-stash-4

Without the Bevel & Emboss, we just see the Pattern and the Inner Shadow.  If we wanted, we could turn off the Inner Shadow also, but I liked it, so I left it turned on.

sd_stretch-stash-5

 Now we have a beautiful line-art graphic with some color variations, which goes really well with the artsy style of Hidden in my Book.

Look at the Styles you own, or some you are considering.  Look past the options on the style (Bevel & Emboss, Inner Shadow, Outer Shadow, Outer Glow, Satin, etc.)  Look just at the pattern itself. Do you like it?  Use it!  Just turn off the Styles options you don’t want, and you have, in essence, created your own style, one that suits your particular needs!

Here is a sample Style to practice with.  Just click HERE or on the image below to download.

sd_stratified-rock-sample-prev

Credits:  Hidden in my Book, a collaboration of The Urban Fairy and Jilbert’s Bits of Bytes; Stratified Rock Styles by SnickerdoodleDesigns. Enjoy Promotional Sales right now!

19 comments ... Join the conversation!

Welcome to Week 3 of our Round Robin!  What is a Round Robin?
A Round Robin is One Month, One Designer, Four Collabs.

How do you come in, and more importantly, how can you save extra?
Answer: Create a LO!

The LO rules are simple:

This week our Round Robin is brought to you by The Urban Fairy and Jilbert’s Bits of Bytes. Check in our Round Robin Forum for all the details.

a4250c9e-7a4b-4e7b-829d-09860f74c050

There’s a place I go where I pour out my thoughts, hopes and dreams; where I can stash away life’s memories, whether it be photos or just bits and pieces of paper. I’m safe here … away from my inner critics … where I can be the artist I always dreamed I’d be. My journal is my best friend and it knows how to keep those secrets I wish to keep hidden.

You will be in art journaling heaven with this kit and to get you started the designers have created this little mini for you, enjoy!!!

***Download***

himb_sampler

5 comments ... Join the conversation!

Unless you’ve been hiding away in some remote cabin without any internet access, you’ve read or seen the results of an action I released last month … the Paper Flower Action. I have been blown away with the response to what started out as a whim and all the excitement it’s generated. And, while there’s been so many positive things said about it, there have also been some problems that, fortunately, people have taken the time to ask me about.

The main problem is the fact that Photoshop does not always “Place” images in the exact center of the canvas. I don’t know why. You’d think the smart people over at Adobe could fix this … and they did have it right at one time, but not anymore. Unfortunately, I can’t control this within the scope of an action … or at least I haven’t figured out how to do it yet. It’s because of this, that I added the wording “Make sure the paper is centered …” into the directions just before you open the paper you’re going to use.

So when you first start off, you open the start file and, depending on your monitor resolution, it kind of looks like this. The reason for all the room around the flower is due to the filter I use to distort the paper that you are about to place on top of the start flower. The canvas is a typical full-size scrapbook page, which is 3600 pixels x 3600 pixels at 300 dpi (or 12 inches x 12 inches at 300 dpi).

flower_tut_view1

Then the action has you open your paper file, which then gets “Placed” on top of the start flower. As I noted, you need to make sure it’s centered which would mean x=1800 px and y=1800 px … but look … it’s no where near that! In all honesty, unless you look at the numbers in the tool bar, you may not even notice because it might only be a little bit off. However, you really need to get into the habit of looking and making sure the numbers are right. NOTE: Unless you have REALLY good eyesight, click on my images to enlarge them.

flower_tut_view2

Why should you look at the numbers? Well, if it just a little off, no problem. However, I continued to run this action using the placement above and look what happened. Of course, to make things a bit more obvious, I had to unclip the paper.

flower_tut_view3

The arrows point out 2 problems. The paper has a gap at the top of the flower and there’s a hole (a little off center) in the middle. This has to do with the filter that I use to distort the paper and, so as not to make your head explode, I’ll not go into the details about it here. In many cases, other than looking weird, if you finish playing the action, the paper will get merged into the start flower and it will pass QC because my start flowers passed QC … but it won’t look right.

So, is there a way to avoid this? One is to make sure the paper is centered before you finalize its placement. The other way to do this is to open the paper before running the action and do a copy/paste from the paper file to the start file. Or do your own “Place” by holding down the shift key as you place the paper. But you will need to remember NOT to start the action at the beginning. Start things up where I show the arrow in the screenshot below.  PLEASE NOTE: This does not apply to PSE versions 6-10. While I have PSE 6, I have yet to test all this out in that version. PLUS, your action was written specifically for the early versions and it’s actually a set of actions and it doesn’t look like the action pictured below.

flower_tut_view6

Personally, while these other methods work, I find it easier to just look in the tool bar and check the position of my paper before I commit it (and this method WILL me work in PSE versions 6-10).

Questions? Comments? I’d love to hear them. I also plan on posting more details on my blog (warning … I’m talking about the kind of details that might make your head explode) — http://BitsOfBytes.jilbert.org — so be sure to keep an eye out if you’re interested.

*** Update ***

Seems Adobe decided to move the tool information for PSE 12 (maybe even earlier versions, but I only have PSE 6 and 12). You can get this information by selecting “Tool Options” from the bar in the lower left side of the window.

PSE_toolbar

9 comments ... Join the conversation!

Adding Shadows to Lace in Photoshop

by SnickerdoodleDesigns 15 March 2014
Thumbnail image for Adding Shadows to Lace in Photoshop

St. Patricks Day is right around the corner!  In 2011 I visited Ireland and fell in love – with the people, with the beautiful country, and with Irish Lace. Last week I released some Irish Lace products, and I have received multiple emails this week asking me the best way to shadow the lace.  Today […]

12 comments Continue reading…

Chasing the Sun by Jilbert’s Bits of Bytes

by tammy 30 January 2014
Thumbnail image for Chasing the Sun by Jilbert’s Bits of Bytes

When that cold wind starts to blow and you haven’t seen a blue sky in weeks, that’s when the chase begins. You realize it will be a long flight, but once you land and the doors of the plane open, you know you will soon be wrapped in the blanket of the sun’s rays and […]

5 comments Continue reading…